Record Producers – Borealnet http://borealnet.org/ Wed, 14 Jul 2021 12:39:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://borealnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Record Producers – Borealnet http://borealnet.org/ 32 32 How the EU’s plan to cut emissions will affect businesses https://borealnet.org/how-the-eus-plan-to-cut-emissions-will-affect-businesses/ https://borealnet.org/how-the-eus-plan-to-cut-emissions-will-affect-businesses/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 12:31:48 +0000 https://borealnet.org/how-the-eus-plan-to-cut-emissions-will-affect-businesses/ FRANKFURT – The sale of new internal combustion engine cars would be banned in the European Union by 2035 as part of a far-reaching plan to slow climate change that also includes stricter mandates for steelmakers, airlines, power producers and many other industries. The plan unveiled on Wednesday by the European Commission, entitled “Fit for […]]]>

FRANKFURT – The sale of new internal combustion engine cars would be banned in the European Union by 2035 as part of a far-reaching plan to slow climate change that also includes stricter mandates for steelmakers, airlines, power producers and many other industries.

The plan unveiled on Wednesday by the European Commission, entitled “Fit for 55”, calls on its 27 member states to reduce their greenhouse gas production by 55% by 2030, compared to 1990 levels.

The EU’s target is more aggressive than that of the United States, which is committed to reducing emissions of 40 to 43 percent over the same period, but behind Great Britain, which pledged to 68 percent reduction. China, the world’s largest emitter, has only said it is targeting emissions at a peak by 2030.

Here’s how the plan would affect industries in Europe:

  • Most automakers have announced plans to switch to electric vehicles, but many have refused to set an expiration date for fossil-fueled vehicles that still generate the most profits. The European Commission’s plan would effectively require them to do so by 2035.

  • Airlines would be forced to start blending synthetic fuel with the fossil fuels they currently use, and steelmakers and other manufacturers would have to pay more for emissions credits.

  • Power producers will be pushed to accelerate the switch to wind, solar and hydropower instead of coal.

  • Shipping companies could not dock in European ports unless they switch to cleaner fuels.

The plan also includes financial incentives that could be welcomed by the industry, such as money to build a more comprehensive network of electric car charging stations. The current network is concentrated in Germany, France and the Netherlands and it can be difficult to find a place to charge an electric vehicle, for example in Italy or Poland.

There will also be money for the groups affected by the new mandates. European Union governments will be able to draw on a fund of 750 billion euros, or $ 890 billion, to help farmers, small businesses and low-income households make the transition to cleaner energy .

Given the number of interests at stake, the plan is at risk of furious lobbying from industry representatives as it progresses through the legislative process in Brussels. The committee’s proposals must be approved by the European Parliament and the leaders of European national governments before they become law, a process which is expected to take around two years.

The plan could also meet resistance from major trading partners like the United States and China, as it would penalize imports from countries considered to have lower environmental standards.

Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission, has made the “European Green Deal” one of her main priorities and can benefit from the support of Europeans increasingly alarmed by forest fires, record hot summers, severe storms and other hard evidence of the toll of climate change.

Monika pronczuk contributed to the report in Brussels.

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Shenseea leaves Romeich and announces Wassim ‘Sal’ Slaiby as new manager https://borealnet.org/shenseea-leaves-romeich-and-announces-wassim-sal-slaiby-as-new-manager/ https://borealnet.org/shenseea-leaves-romeich-and-announces-wassim-sal-slaiby-as-new-manager/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 01:54:47 +0000 https://borealnet.org/shenseea-leaves-romeich-and-announces-wassim-sal-slaiby-as-new-manager/ Shenseea announces new manager Wassim ‘Sal’ Slaiby after splitting from Romeich Major. The “Blessed” singer made the announcement Monday night as she officially confirmed what has been the subject of speculation for months now that she is no longer part of the Romeich Entertainment camp. In a post shared on Instagram, Shenseea introduced her new […]]]>

Shenseea announces new manager Wassim ‘Sal’ Slaiby after splitting from Romeich Major.

The “Blessed” singer made the announcement Monday night as she officially confirmed what has been the subject of speculation for months now that she is no longer part of the Romeich Entertainment camp. In a post shared on Instagram, Shenseea introduced her new manager Wassim Slaiby.

“#ShenYengz allows you to introduce my new manager… I am happy to have one with such a dynamic character in my team! “She declared before adding:” we are about to unveil a new chapter! More hard work, more determination but with the same God… LET’S GO XO!

The post was accompanied by several photos of Shenseea posing with her new manager and international music producer Rvssian.

Shenseea was the first female artist to be signed by Romeich Entertainment in 2016 when company owner and former Shenseea director Romeich Major announced that the brand, which was based solely on event production, fashion , artist management and booking, was now getting into music. production.

At the time of signing with Romeich, Shenseea was just a bottle waitress with a hidden talent. His first single, “Jiggle”, set the tone for his career as many immediately turned to the artist and his fan base grew.

Speaking about signing Shenseea at the time, Romeich noted that Shenseea was a “complete” artist as he noted his potential for international stardom.

“Shenseea brings the complete package to the entertainment industry, so with their talent and work ethic and promotional prowess, we are definitely a winning team,” he said.

Shenseea has also spoken enthusiastically about the recording deal with Romeich Entertainment.

“This union has been more than I could have hoped for and I just put in as much work as I can and take it one day at a time. I fit in everywhere and I can play for anyone… there are no rules in music. I write what I want, don’t stick to one topic… I’m unpredictable, so stay tuned for Shenseea, ”she said at the time.

Since her stint at Romeich Entertainment, Shenseea has grown from a local artist to now an aspiring international star with several collaborations under her belt, which has undoubtedly garnered much-needed attention for her brand of music. abroad. It is only a matter of time before it penetrates the US mainstream music market.

Despite the change in their professional relationship, Shenseea and Romeich continue to share a good relationship outside of music. The “lighter” singjay recently revealed that she is the godmother of Romeich’s 5-month-old baby girl, Skye Major.

Romeich has long been a father figure to Shenseea’s son Rajeiro, whom he called his son. He even got business approval deals for the 5-year-old. However, not so long ago, rumors spread that Shenseea and Romeich may have been romantically involved, which led to his interest and investment in boosting his career as he did.

Among those who peddled the rumors were several female dancehall artists who spoke bitterly about not receiving the same level of investment in dancehall music.

However, neither Shenseea nor Romeich addressed the rumors as they continued to appear close and share family trips and outings with Shenseea’s son Rajeiro Lee.

For the most part, Romeich has not confirmed the split. This is the second artist to leave him in months as Shenseea’s split comes after Teejay’s.

In June, Urban Islandz announced that Teejay had signed with Solid Agency led by music industry maestro Sharon Burke. He later revealed that his decision was to advance his career even though there were rumors spread by his fans that Romeich’s focus on Shenseea caused Teejay’s career to stagnate, and he did not. managed to reach his potential so far despite the fact shot after shot.

Teejay noted, “Well like they said in a shotta before, you can’t be a baby forever, you have to grow up,” the deejay said.

The 27-year-old artist who had his big chance at Reggae Sumfest in 2018 noted that he had new goals he wanted to achieve, which called for moving on to bigger things.

“Every year I have accomplishments that I try to complete every year… I have goals that I try to achieve every year in a lifetime, so this year I’m trying to achieve a lot, I stay focused on the moment – we haffi move, we haffi graduates, we haffi level saying you see mi and just dat mi doing it right now.

Meanwhile, Shenseea is in the United States to record their debut album. She hasn’t revealed the album’s name or possible features, but has been busy on social media as she shares her daily activities, including promotions on her upcoming music release.

Her album is expected to feature multiple genres of music, including a mix of dancehall, rap and trap, especially as she dabbles with the best in the rap and hip hop industry.

Earlier this month, she shared on her Instagram account stories of herself and producer London On The Track, who is best known for her Roddy Ricch and Gunna hits “Numbers”, “Something real” with Chris Brown, “No Flag” with Nicki Minaj. , 21 Savage and Offset, “Sneakin” by Drake and 21 Savage and among others. He’s also done a lot of work on Summer Walker’s albums, even though the couple share a child together.

Shenseea has previously been spotted with musical director ‘Sal’ Slaiby and several artists also directed by Slaiby, who could possibly feature on her next album.

Slaiby is known as a successful manager in the industry with a few renowned artists and producers under his direction such as Doja Cat, The Weeknd, French Montana, Metro Boomin, London On Da Track, Ty Dolla $ ign, Nav and Swedish House Mafia .

Romeich Major still manages Ding Dong as the only other major dancehall artist and his first signer has remained in his camp.

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Smoke and extreme heat put a strain on West Coast vineyards https://borealnet.org/smoke-and-extreme-heat-put-a-strain-on-west-coast-vineyards/ https://borealnet.org/smoke-and-extreme-heat-put-a-strain-on-west-coast-vineyards/#respond Sun, 11 Jul 2021 02:24:47 +0000 https://borealnet.org/smoke-and-extreme-heat-put-a-strain-on-west-coast-vineyards/ Vineyards in the region have been exposed to record high temperatures nine months after recent heat waves that hit the Pacific Northwest hit world-class wine-growing vineyards with smoke from wildfires. At the end of June, the vines in Oregon and Washington were still young, as small as BB, and often covered with uncut foliage. The […]]]>

Vineyards in the region have been exposed to record high temperatures nine months after recent heat waves that hit the Pacific Northwest hit world-class wine-growing vineyards with smoke from wildfires. At the end of June, the vines in Oregon and Washington were still young, as small as BB, and often covered with uncut foliage. The good news for viticulture, winegrowers and wine lovers is the arrival of a historic heatwave. When the fruit is barely damaged in a narrow window. The tragedy may have happened sooner or later in the growing season. The bad news is that climate change tends to frequently cause extreme weather events and forest fires. About a week after extreme temperatures hit the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia on June 25, and only a week later, less intense heat waves hit parts of the western states again. -United, with hundreds of people. There may have been heat-related deaths. Some parts of the country typically have plenty of sunny summer days, but wine growers are worried about what still awaits the historic drought associated with climate change: extreme temperatures. The wildfire is expected to be fierce, with the possibility of another attack. This includes Christine Claire, manager of Willamette Valley Vineyards in Turner, just outside of the Oregon capital. She saw a rare breeze last September that choked the Willamette Valley, famous for its delicate Pinot Noir, with smoke from the nearby flames. “Last year was my first experience in the Willamette Valley, which was hit by forest fires and smoke. Claire said: In recent years, wineries around the world have moved to cooler areas and theirs. By planting such varieties, they began to hedge their bets on global warming and its consequences. Likewise, following the heatwave in the north-west, the estate plans to protect its crops from more intense sunlight. At Dusted Valley Vintners in Wallawara, Wash., Co-owner Chad Johnson says the leaf canopy is pruned to keep the grapes in shade and prevent sunburn. Very hot mornings. Workers who are limited to work leave more grapes on the vine, slowing fruit ripening, Joe Nson said in early summer in eastern Washington near the Oregon border. I haven’t seen a thermometer above 100 degrees Celsius (38 degrees Celsius) in the city for a few days. Johnson has had an unprecedented career since making wine here for 20 years. June 29 was the hottest day in Walla Walla history, reaching 116 degrees Fahrenheit (47 degrees Fahrenheit), twice as high as previous records. Climate change Johnson says he’s become a concern major for him and other winemakers around the world. “If it weren’t for that horrible early spring frost in Europe this year, it would be a dry forest fire in the west.” Johnson said: “C ‘is always something, “” and it gets more and more difficult with each passing year. “Mentioned. Meanwhile, the industry is summing up the damage from last year’s wildfire that covered heavy smoke California, Oregon and Washington I tried testing the fruit to see if it was worth harvesting for the nasty “smoke spots” of wine made from grapes. Some testing laboratories were overwhelmed and could not meet demand. wineries have chosen not to risk damaging the brand by turning some of their grapes into bad wines and have stopped accepting untested grapes from producers. The California Wine Grape Producers Association said in an email. Industry estimates suggest California growers lost $ 601 million from unharvested wine grapes. It’s very annoying for many growers, ”said Aguile, noting that heat, drought, frost, excessive rains, pests and diseases also need to be addressed. You can try to minimize the damage. For example, some grapes exposed to smoke can be turned into rosé instead of red wine. This limits contact with the grape skins during winemaking and can reduce the concentration of smoked aromatic compounds. Many wineries are excited about the 2020 vintage, according to a California harvest report from the San Francisco-based Wine Institute. Corey Beck, CEO and head of winemaking at Francis Ford Coppola Winery in Sonoma County, Calif., Said he was optimistic based on small batch fermentation testing. Wine Institute.Willamette Valley Vineyards also fermented small samples of grapes to determine if the smoke affects the resulting wine. The 2020 Whole Cluster Pinot Noir vintage received accolades from Wine Enthusiast magazine. However, winemaking is so difficult and competitive that when he asks Johnson for advice on entering the industry, he tries to discourage them. “It’s probably not a good idea,” he said. “It’s really, really hard, and it’s getting harder and harder.”

A recent heat wave hit vineyards exposed to the Pacific Northwest in the region to record temperatures nine months after smoke from a wildfire blanketed world-class wine-growing vineyards.

However, when temperatures started to climb to nearly 120 degrees Fahrenheit (49 degrees Celsius) in late June, the Oregon and Washington grapes were still young, as small as BBs, and most leaves uncut. It was covered with a canopy.

The good news for viticulture, winemakers and wine lovers is the historic heatwave between the narrow windows where the fruit was barely damaged. It may have been disastrous at the start or end of the growing season.

The bad news is that extreme weather events and forest fires tend to be common due to climate change. About a week after extreme temperatures hit the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia on June 25, and only a week later, less intense heat waves hit parts of the western states again. -United, with hundreds of people. There may have been heat-related deaths.

This cool, rainy part of the country usually has plenty of sunny summer days, but wine growers are still concerned about the future of the historic drought associated with climate change. Extremely high temperatures can strike again and forest fires are expected to be fierce.

That includes Christine Claire, winery manager at Willamette Valley Vineyards in Turner, just outside the Oregon capital. She saw a rare breeze last September that choked the Willamette Valley, famous for its delicate Pinot Noir, with smoke from the nearby flames.

“Last year was my first experience in Willamette Valley, which was affected by forest fires and smoke. It was considered a unique oriental event in the century, but it is now under threat every year. I think there are, ”says Claire.

In recent years, wineries around the world have hedged their bets on global warming and its fallout by moving to cooler areas, planting varieties that excel in heat and drought, and covering vines with more than foliage. started.

Likewise, in the wake of heatwaves in the north-west, the estate plans to protect its crops from more intense sunlight.

According to co-owner Chad Johnson, at Dusted Valley Vintners in Walla Walla, Wash., Less canopy cutting is done to keep grapes in shade and prevent sunburn.

Workers who are forced to work on very hot mornings also leave vines on the vines, Johnson said, slowing the ripening of the fruit.

He had seen heat wave-like conditions in early summer in an eastern Washington town near the Oregon border, with thermometers rising above 100 F (38 C ) during many days. There are not any.

“It’s really unusual and unprecedented in my career because I’ve been making wine here for 20 years,” Johnson said.

June 29 was the hottest day in Walla Walla history, hitting 116 F (47 C), breaking the previous record twice.

Johnson said climate change has become a major concern for him and other winemakers around the world.

“If it weren’t for that horrible early spring frost that they are having in Europe this year, it would be a dry forest fire in the west.” Johnson said: “It’s always something and it gets more and more difficult every year.” Said.

Meanwhile, the industry is summing up the damage from last year’s wildfires that devastated California, Oregon and Washington. smoke..

So many California growers worried about the nasty “smoke spots” in wines made from grapes and tried testing the fruits to see if the crops were worth harvesting.

Some testing labs were overwhelmed and could not keep up with demand. Some wineries have chosen not to risk damaging the brand by turning some of their grapes into bad wines and have stopped accepting untested grapes from producers.

“Without a doubt, the financial sacrifice made to California winegrowers has been unprecedented,” John Aguile, president of the California Wine Grape Growers Association, said in an email.

According to industry estimates, California growers have lost $ 601 million from unharvested wine grapes, Aguile said.

“The risk of forest fires seems to be greater today than in the past, which is very annoying for many growers,” said Aguile, who said the heat, drought, frost, strong rains, pests and disease also said it had to be tackled. .

There is little that wineries can do to prevent wildfires outside of premises, but in the event of a smoke flood you can try to minimize the damage. For example, some grapes exposed to smoke can be turned into rosé instead of red wine. This limits contact with the grape skins during winemaking and can reduce the concentration of smoked aromatic compounds.

A report on the California harvest from the San Francisco-based Wine Institute said many wineries were excited about the 2020 vintage, despite the challenges.

Corey Beck, CEO and head of winemaking at Francis Ford Coppola Winery in Sonoma County, Calif., Said he was optimistic based on small batch fermentation testing.

“It was like, ‘Oh my god, these wines are great,'” Beck told the Wine Institute.

Willamette Valley Vineyards also fermented a small sample of the grapes to determine if the smoke affects the resulting wine. The 2020 Whole Cluster Pinot Noir vintage received accolades from Wine Enthusiast magazine.

However, winemaking is so difficult and competitive that when he asks Johnson for advice on entering the industry, he tries to discourage them.

“The first thing I do is probably tell them it’s not a good idea. It’s really, really hard, and it’s getting harder and harder, ”he said.

Smoke and extreme heat put a strain on West Coast vineyards Source link Smoke and extreme heat put a strain on West Coast vineyards

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A Historian’s Book on Satchel Paige on the Road to Hollywood https://borealnet.org/a-historians-book-on-satchel-paige-on-the-road-to-hollywood/ https://borealnet.org/a-historians-book-on-satchel-paige-on-the-road-to-hollywood/#respond Fri, 09 Jul 2021 21:46:55 +0000 https://borealnet.org/a-historians-book-on-satchel-paige-on-the-road-to-hollywood/ History professor Donald Spivey spent 12 years researching and writing “If You Were Only White: The Life of Leroy ‘Satchel’ Paige. Today, Apple Studios acquired the text rights to a drama series on Negro Leagues Baseball, using Paige’s life as a backdrop. Hollywood director Ron Shelton had long aspired to read a definitive biography on […]]]>

History professor Donald Spivey spent 12 years researching and writing “If You Were Only White: The Life of Leroy ‘Satchel’ Paige. Today, Apple Studios acquired the text rights to a drama series on Negro Leagues Baseball, using Paige’s life as a backdrop.



Hollywood director Ron Shelton had long aspired to read a definitive biography on Leroy “Satchel” Paige, a biography that did not simply recycle old information from an encyclopedia, but a complete and accurate work that includes new details about the life of the legendary negro. Baseball star of the leagues.

Then one day the Oscar nominee of fame “Bull Durham” read the book by University of Miami history professor Donald Spivey, “If You Were Only White: The Life of Leroy ‘Satchel ‘Paige’ and called the researcher.

“He expressed his joy with the book and that he had been waiting for years for a work worthy of Paige’s legacy,” Spivey recalled.

Now, the historian’s exhaustive non-fiction work is heading to Hollywood. Apple Studios has secured the rights to the book for dramatic development for a series that will explore the epic history of Negro Leagues Baseball using Paige’s life as a backdrop. “It’s exciting,” beamed Spivey, professor emeritus at the College of Arts and Sciences.

Kansas City Monarchs pitcher Leroy Satchel Paige warms up at Yankee Stadium in New York City before a Negro League game between the Monarchs and the New York Cuban Stars on August 2, 1942. Photo: The Associated Press

Paige has been a star of the Negro Leagues for over two decades and arguably one of the greatest pitchers of all time. He was as much an artist as he was an athlete, traveling the country and showcasing his throwing prowess in now legendary feats. Sometimes, for example, he would have his infielders sit behind him and then hit the side, sending the message that black baseball players, who were not allowed to play in the major leagues. , were just as talented as their white counterparts. In 1948, at the age of 42, he made his Major League debut with the Cleveland Indians.

Spivey spent 12 years researching and writing the book, interviewing many Black League greats, and visiting cities such as Birmingham, Pittsburgh and Chicago, where Paige performed. His research also took him abroad, to Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and Mexico, where Paige also pitched.

“Initially, I thought that doing a definitive biography of Satchel Paige would take me two years, three peaks. I was wrong, really wrong, ”Spivey said. “For history to be correct, the historian must be intimately familiar with events, problems and places. I once joked with Satchel’s son Paige that I started to hate his dad over the years because his travels forced me to read so many more stories and travel all over the place.

Although Spivey continued to work on the book, another biography of Paige was published in 2006 before her own. “I wasn’t finished at the time and was totally determined to do more than just rehash familiar stories,” Spivey explained. “I was committed to developing a complete and precise portrait, to telling the story well. It was too important to me as an African American, historian and sports expert. I took the time and got it right.

And that’s one of the reasons Spivey thinks his book was picked by Apple Studios, which is co-producing the series with Kapital Entertainment, based in West Hollywood, California. Shelton, who also directed “White Men Can’t Jump” and whose daughter, Valentina, is a senior at the Frost School of Music at the University of Miami, and Hall of Fame member Earvin “Magic” Johnson. the NBA, are executive producers. The project is also supported by Peter Guber of Mandalay Entertainment, the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum and Major League Baseball.

Spivey will serve as a consultant but will have no veto power. “If something isn’t a documentary, you’ll always have a challenge in portraying it accurately. And that’s why I’m thrilled to have Magic Johnson and Ron Shelton at the helm, ”said Spivey, noting that both are familiar with baseball Paige and Negro Leagues and appreciate the research Spivey has put into his book.

“I hope this series will help everyone appreciate the obstacles and triumphs of these black leagues and better understand the legacy of systemic racism that plagues the United States and around the world,” said the historian, who serves also special adviser to President Julio Frenk on racial justice. Spivey credits the “superb leadership” of the University for contributing to the “forward momentum” of the project.

The history of the black leagues is not limited to baseball. It’s also about the civil rights struggle that went on concurrently around that time, Spivey said.

“Too often, the Negro Leaguers have been seen as mere ball players,” he lamented. “They were black in America, and they knew it. Players like Paige; Buck O’Neil; and great dancer, artist and black team owner Bill “Bojangles” Robinson supported the anti-lynching crusade, black youth development and the civil rights movement.

Spivey has said he intends to encourage producers to pass these facts on on the show.

It’s long overdue, according to Spivey. “These great black league baseball players have been thrown into the shadows because of the horrible color line that existed in America,” he said. “Superbly talented and superior players in every position, however, they were the wrong color.”

Black athletes weren’t allowed to compete in the Majors until 1947, when Jackie Robinson broke through the color barrier, entering Ebbets Field to start on first base for the Brooklyn Dodgers. But Robinson, who played in the Majors for 10 years helping the Dodgers win the 1955 World Series, was just one of many Negro Leaguers who, had they had the chance, would not only have started. , but would also have excelled in the Majors, Spivey is noted.

“Satchel Paige was one of them,” he said. “He had his moment in 1948 when he was signed by Cleveland at the age of 42, well past his prime but still able to shine.”

Spivey noted something else that was long overdue: putting the Negro Leaguers’ stats into the record books.

Baseball-Reference, a website that compiles baseball statistics for every player in Major League Baseball history, incorporates data from the Black League era from 1920 to 1948 in its record book. And the MLB, which elevated the Black Leagues to major league status, is doing the same, correcting a long-standing oversight.

But statistics alone “will never come close to righting the monumental harm done to so many people over so many years,” Spivey said. “Hopefully the show will.”




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Commentary: ESPN must fix pervasive racing issues https://borealnet.org/commentary-espn-must-fix-pervasive-racing-issues/ https://borealnet.org/commentary-espn-must-fix-pervasive-racing-issues/#respond Tue, 06 Jul 2021 23:56:46 +0000 https://borealnet.org/commentary-espn-must-fix-pervasive-racing-issues/ The best black voices keep leaving ESPN for a reason. The latest symptom of a deep-rooted problem was propelled into national limelight when The New York Times reported Sunday that Rachel Nichols, who is white, was filmed, suggesting that ESPN shouldn’t have selected Maria Taylor, who is black, rather than her to host a prestigious […]]]>

The best black voices keep leaving ESPN for a reason.

The latest symptom of a deep-rooted problem was propelled into national limelight when The New York Times reported Sunday that Rachel Nichols, who is white, was filmed, suggesting that ESPN shouldn’t have selected Maria Taylor, who is black, rather than her to host a prestigious pre-game NBA playoff show.

“If you have to give [Maria] more stuff to do because you feel the pressure about your long-standing diversity record – which by the way, I know personally on the female side – like, go ahead, ”Nichols said during of a telephone conversation, according to a video recording obtained by The Times.

The call was captured by an ESPN camera in July 2020 while Nichols was in quarantine in his hotel room in the NBA bubble. Video of the conversation was stored on ESPN servers and soon shared by company employees who were upset by the suggestion that Taylor had not earned her role.

Nichols has repeatedly apologized for the conversation, most recently Monday at the start of “The Jump,” the daily NBA show she hosts. On Tuesday, ESPN announced that Malika Andrews would replace Nichols as secondary reporter to “stay the course for the NBA Finals.”

Nichols had not previously been sanctioned by ESPN for her remarks. Taylor asked that she not be forced to work with Nichols on camera according to the New York Times report. The request was granted, but it was frequently reviewed and Taylor had to defend his position.

It is a model familiar to the network.

“ESPN has a consistent history of undervaluing black talent,” former ESPN presenter Jemele Hill told the Los Angeles Times in an interview Monday. “It’s not a Rachel versus Maria story. It’s a story about why they didn’t appreciate Maria enough to allow her to take full ownership of the job.

“ESPN collects black faces, but it seems like when those black faces turn into black voices, that’s a problem.”

The combination of ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro’s initial tenure, economic stress accelerated by a global pandemic, and a national reckoning with race created hostile working conditions for journalists of color at ESPN.

Like most business leaders at the height of Black Lives Matter’s protests last year, Pitaro is committed to improving the culture of the workplace. He relaxed restrictions on political speech, especially following the murder of George Floyd and the shooting of Jacob Blake. But these adjustments were not widely adopted, and Taylor was criticized by some colleagues for her comment after Floyd’s death.

Pitaro and ESPN’s senior management unfortunately did not keep their promise.

Five sources at different levels at ESPN confirmed the New York Times report on the intense stress and unhappiness of many black employees and other journalists of color. It’s not just limited to Taylor, Hill and other on-air talent, with senior producers and support staff behind the cameras being frustrated as well.

“ESPN collects black faces, but it seems like when those black faces turn into black voices, that’s a problem.”

Jemele Hill

National Association of Black Journalists President Dorothy Tucker posted on Twitter Sunday that the only person sanctioned for the incident was a black producer who told human resources she shared the video with Taylor. The woman was suspended for two weeks without pay and given less desirable tasks. She recently left ESPN.

“I have concerns: The black ESPN employee was punished for revealing the incident, but no action was taken against the white ESPN talent for insulting the black talent? There will be a follow-up after the holidays, ”Tucker wrote.

ESPN spokesperson Josh Krulewitz told The New York Times: “A diverse group of executives thoroughly and fairly reviewed all of the facts related to the incident and then dealt with the situation appropriately. “

Many focused on the unsettling conversation between Nichols and LeBron’s adviser James Adam Mendelsohn, who himself apologized for suggesting during the conversation that the Me Too and Black Lives Matters moves led him to exhaustion.

But as Hill notes, this conversation is a symptom of a much deeper problem.

It’s not difficult to do the right thing, and yet ESPN management has repeatedly failed to support black female journalists.

Taylor has been described to the Los Angeles Times by current and former ESPN employees as a “perfect reporter.” In addition to her talent on camera, she is known internally for working hard, mentoring young journalists from all walks of life, and building a foundation to support women and journalists of color.

She deserved clear and unambiguous support in the face of a diversity-tired hiring smear.

The overwhelming majority of journalists of color have heard some form of this attack relayed either on their faces or on their backs. You have filled their quota. You are hiring diversity. You are only here because of your gender or your race.

This can take the form of jokes and is sometimes leveled off casually, as if it isn’t a bomb that can destroy the target’s confidence or cause them to do more work in an effort to prove their worth. .

Why did Nichols seek advice from Mendelsohn? Why didn’t she think her concerns about her own role would be assessed fairly? Why was her language not clearly handed over to staff and, at a minimum, training provided to emphasize why this was unacceptable no matter how it was revealed?

ESPN reporter Rachel Nichols stands on the field before a 2020 game between the Houston Rockets and the Dallas Mavericks in Lake Buena Vista, Florida.

(Mike Ehrmann / Pool Photo via AP)

Yes, that was an accidentally taped conversation, but it was with someone who has a direct impact on how Taylor does her job. This is public defamation, no matter how the conversation has been shared within the company.

ESPN proudly boasts that it has hired more women and journalists of color than any other media company, but it also has the most jobs – the most premium jobs – available. Support for its diverse staff is weak. ESPN has few female executives of color with the leverage to resolve conflict based on their clear understanding of the depth of the issues.

NBA Countdown producer Amina Hussein, a 17-year veteran and one of ESPN’s top-ranked female executives and journalists of color, left in December.

“I only worked with one other African American woman at ESPN and that was Julaine Edwards as part of the SEC network,” Taylor said. Forbes in December 2019. “So having Amina involved is everything for me.”

Hussein’s departure had a direct impact on how ESPN’s fractured NBA team have responded to the current conflicts.

This is an issue in all media, which denounces inequalities in other spaces, but has not yet fully addressed it in its own ranks. This includes the Los Angeles Times, which has made strides, but rightly recognizes that there is still a lot of work to be done.

Racial inequality in the media is frequently highlighted, but real progress requires investment in training diverse managers – including women of color – and empowering them to lead. Until companies invest in these leaders, they will continue to be embarrassed.

Why is this important?

Failure to invest in truly diverse leadership will erode the ability to tell the best stories in a competitive space, accelerate audience loss, and hamper long-term income opportunities.

You are just going to lose in any way you can.

Until companies invest in [cultivating diverse leaders], they will continue to be embarrassed.

How do you fix this?

It takes more than hiring journalists of color from other companies, saying journalism conferences are important and sponsor diversity.

Do it, but also cultivate and raise diverse voices within your team. Listen to them, give them a chance to lead, and give them the opportunity to learn from failure.

ESPN has never had to be in this position. He has to listen to incoming calls from the National Association of Black Journalists. But more importantly, he needs to start listening to calls for change coming from his own offices.

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NSW mouse plague discount available | Grenfell’s record https://borealnet.org/nsw-mouse-plague-discount-available-grenfells-record/ https://borealnet.org/nsw-mouse-plague-discount-available-grenfells-record/#respond Sun, 04 Jul 2021 21:10:26 +0000 https://borealnet.org/nsw-mouse-plague-discount-available-grenfells-record/ Farmers in New South Wales hit by a devastating mouse invasion that caused millions of dollars in property and crop damage can now claim rebates. Deputy Prime Minister John Barilaro said eligible households can claim up to $ 500 and small businesses up to $ 1,000 to help offset the cost of mouse baits, traps […]]]>

Farmers in New South Wales hit by a devastating mouse invasion that caused millions of dollars in property and crop damage can now claim rebates.

Deputy Prime Minister John Barilaro said eligible households can claim up to $ 500 and small businesses up to $ 1,000 to help offset the cost of mouse baits, traps and cleaning supplies purchased from February.

“These rodents have not only impacted farmers and crops, they have also been a plague on homes and businesses in all regions,” he said in a statement Monday.

“You can only claim once, so I encourage residents and small business owners who have spent near the maximum amount available to visit the Service NSW website today.”

Agriculture Minister Adam Marshall said primary producers who live where they work can claim a single rebate of up to $ 1,000.

“As we get closer to the spring harvest (…) this discount will also help them protect their homes,” he said.

By the end of the month, farmers will also be able to claim a 50% rebate on zinc phosphide bait, up to a maximum of $ 10,000, through the Rural Assistance Authority.

Eligible farms can apply for the household or small business rebate through the Service NSW website, where they can download receipts for mouse bait, trap and cleanup purchases dating back to February.

Associated Australian Press

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Them Coulee Boys new record reflects on … https://borealnet.org/them-coulee-boys-new-record-reflects-on/ https://borealnet.org/them-coulee-boys-new-record-reflects-on/#respond Sat, 03 Jul 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://borealnet.org/them-coulee-boys-new-record-reflects-on/ NAMESAKE. Them Coulee Boys gave more than 150 shows a year – more or less – before COVID-19 hit last spring. This is what led them to focus on music, which led them to their latest album, Namesake, which will be released on August 6th. (Photo by Scott Kunkel) Last year was set to be […]]]>

NAMESAKE. Them Coulee Boys gave more than 150 shows a year – more or less – before COVID-19 hit last spring. This is what led them to focus on music, which led them to their latest album, Namesake, which will be released on August 6th. (Photo by Scott Kunkel)

Last year was set to be the biggest year yet for Them Coulee Boys – after a veritable string of years that just kept getting bigger. The group – made up of Soren and Jens Staff, Beau Janke, Neil Krause and Staš Hable – had just completed a series of shows aboard a Norwegian Cruise Line ship, and performed to their most astounding audiences to date in tour with Trampled By Turtles… when you-know-what happened.

For a band that regularly played at a breakneck pace of 150 gigs a year, give or take, not being able to do your thing for a year and change was a big challenge, but a blessing nonetheless. Everyone got away with it, safe and sound. Beau and his wife welcomed their first child in September. And, for the first time in nearly ten years of a band’s existence, I felt like a weight had been lifted.

In fact, it brought us together a lot. Like, tighter and more honest with each other.

Handsome Janke

the coulee boys

“We’ve always had this mentality – if we don’t play, we die. But we’re all fine now. We’re all still doing well, ”Beau said. “It actually brought us together a lot. Like, tighter and more honest with each other.

At first, they filled the void with live broadcasts of the Pandemic Era from their windowless training space at Artisan Forge Studios. On the one hand, nicknamed “TCB Variety Hour”, each member had 20 minutes to do whatever they wanted. Neil tried eating 40 pizza rolls in six minutes, Beau dressed up as Santa Claus and played Christmas carols in May, and Jens even sang a few covers on his own.

“I can be in front of 5,000 people and not be nervous at all, but just me and a camera, I’m shaking all the time,” Jens admitted.

After a few of them – and a notable remote performance for Blue Ox: Live From The Pines last summer – the band decided to really dive into the songs that would become their next album. Namesake.

NAMESAKE

Designed, written, recorded and finished during lockdown, these new songs reflect on the important things in life once you’ve taken it all away: family, legacy, friendship, memory, love.

“That sums up a lot. I have thought about family a lot. Grief and legacy are linked. And what it means to live.”

Soren’s Staff

The boys cast

Namesake is a big word for it, ”Soren said. “That sums up a lot of things. I thought about the family a lot. Mourning and inheritance are linked. And what it means to live.

This record marks the first time that Them Coulee Boys has worked with the producer Brian Joseph at the Beehive, who has worked with artists such as Paul Simon, The Indigo Girls and Ani DiFranco – as well as Sufjan Stevens, S. Carey, Bon Iver and The Fray. They have already had producers on records (notably, Dave Simonett of Trampled By Turtles produced the years 2019 To die happy), but something really clicked this time.

“He gave advice, he challenged. He was also not afraid to say, “That sucked,” Beau said. “At first I was like ‘Who is this guy?’ Then I was like ‘Oh, there’s a Grammy here.’ ”

CLOSE AND CUSTOMIZE

The sessions were fruitful and proved to provide some of the best work in the group to date. Track three on Namesake is a tribute to a close friend who passed away last year – “Phil’s Song,” which encapsulates the delicate balance of grief, joy, loss, gratitude, and poignant stretches of life found throughout the record .

“Phil’s Song” is not a sad song; that’s pretty optimistic, actually. It’s a rock’n’roll song that celebrates their friend’s legacy without drowning in grief. It’s personal and raw, but there is joy there. It was one of the last recorded during these sessions, and the memory of that moment in the studio remains engraved.

“I know exactly what it looked like, what it looked like,” Beau said. “I remember the outside temperature, everything.”

A DEDICATED FAN BASE

Them Coulee Boys left the studio with an album filled with some of their best and brightest. They’re posting this one independently as well, with the help of wild success Launch campaign to the tune of approximately $ 80,000 from fans and supporters. They reached their first goal within 72 hours of launching the campaign and more than doubled.

I’m just grateful. It’s so good to be able to do this stuff again.

Soren staff

The boys cast

This crush of support from their ever-growing fanbase is what keeps Them Coulee Boys blowing these days, ready to drop this album, hit the road again, create memories and continue to build their own legacy, through them- same. They do what they do best – fill this world with music. And it does not stop there.

“I’m just grateful,” Soren said. “It’s so good to be able to do this stuff again.”


Namesake was released on August 6. The main single, “Given Up”, is now available on all streaming services. The band performs throughout Wisconsin in July and August, including the Blue Ox Music Festival at Eau Claire. To learn more about Them Coulee Boys, visit thecouleeboys.com.

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Shares hit record highs as US jobless claims plunge https://borealnet.org/shares-hit-record-highs-as-us-jobless-claims-plunge/ https://borealnet.org/shares-hit-record-highs-as-us-jobless-claims-plunge/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 19:49:00 +0000 https://borealnet.org/shares-hit-record-highs-as-us-jobless-claims-plunge/ Add the closing price of oil European stocks approach record high as data improves Dollar hits 15-month high against the yen, 4-month high against the euro Oil climbs 2% per barrel All eyes on Friday’s payroll data NEW YORK, July 1 (Reuters) – Global stock markets rose on Thursday on strong European and US stocks, […]]]>
  • Add the closing price of oil
  • European stocks approach record high as data improves
  • Dollar hits 15-month high against the yen, 4-month high against the euro
  • Oil climbs 2% per barrel
  • All eyes on Friday’s payroll data

NEW YORK, July 1 (Reuters) – Global stock markets rose on Thursday on strong European and US stocks, with stocks pushing back a rapid re-acceleration of coronavirus cases and oil and the dollar extending their first-half rallies.

On Wall Street, the S&P 500 index kicked off the second half of the year at an all-time high, with data showing fewer than expected weekly jobless claims, while energy stocks were supported by a surge in prices of the oil. Read more

London (.FTSE), Frankfurt (.GDAXI), Paris (.FCHI) and Milan (.FTMIB) overcame a mid-morning swing to keep the pan-European STOXX 600 at an all-time high.

In a session in Asia thinned by a Hong Kong holiday, the Japanese Nikkei (.N225) fell 0.3% and the yen hit a 15-month low, sources in Tokyo saying COVID restrictions -19 were likely to be extended. Read more

Oil prices rose about 2% on indications that OPEC + producers may increase production more slowly than expected in the coming months, as rising global demand for fuel continues to tighten l ‘offer. Read more

The dollar index hit three-month highs ahead of Friday’s US jobs report, which may offer clues as to when the Federal Reserve will start cutting stimulus.

“Markets digest improving economic data and rising inflation, scrutinizing central bank communications for clues regarding the timing, process and extent of policy normalization,” said Ben Randl, senior analyst at Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

US government bond prices were lower, with the benchmark 10-year yield falling 1.4696% for the last time. The benchmark 10-year German Bund yield rose one basis point on the day to -0.2%. French, Spanish and Italian 10-year yields increased similarly,,.

Gold rose on Thursday alongside a drop in the dollar and Treasury yields, reducing some of the precious metal’s losses last month.

The MSCI gauge of equities around the world (.MIWD00000PUS) rose 1.07 points, or 0.15%, and the pan-European STOXX 600 index (.STOXX) rose 0.62%. The largest MSCI index of Asia-Pacific stocks outside of Japan (.MIAPJ0000PUS) was last 0.62% lower.

TENSIONS IN TAIWAN

In China overnight, the stock markets applauded the Communist Party’s centenary with a slight uptick, but a nationalist speech by President Xi Jinping in Tiananmen Square did little to appease geopolitical nerves, and the yuan weakened.

Xi vowed to complete “reunification” with self-governing Taiwan and “crush” any attempt at formal independence.

Slowing vaccination rates in Asia and extending restrictions to curb the spread of the virus – along with a regulatory crackdown on Chinese tech giants – have lagged regional markets this year.

The MSCI Ex-Japan Index closed the first half with a 5.8% gain versus the rise in global equities (.MIWD00000PUS) of 11.4% and a gain of 14.4% for the S&P 500, which had recorded his fifth consecutive record in closed on S1 Wednesday.

However, it was Friday’s US wages that traders believed could shake markets from a sleep that has locked currencies in some of their tightest trading ranges in decades. The state’s initial jobless claims fell from 51,000 to 364,000 seasonally adjusted for the week ending June 26, the Labor Department said Thursday, although they are not a reliable guide to indicators more Friday broads.

June was the best month for the dollar since Donald Trump was elected President of the United States in November 2016, said Lee Hardman, currency analyst at MUFG.

“The key trigger,” he said, “was the hawkish shift in Fed policy. The more hawkish guidance has made market participants less confident that the Fed will maintain loose policy in the years to come. to come up.”

The Dow Jones Industrial Average (.DJI) rose 94.32 points, or 0.27%, the S&P 500 (.SPX) gained 18.85 points, or 0.44%, and the Nasdaq Composite (.IXIC ) added 0.65 points, or 0%, to 14,504.60.

The US dollar index, which measures the greenback against a basket of six major currencies, rose 0.148 points, or 0.16%, with the euro up 0.06% to $ 1.1862.

Brent crude gained $ 1.22, or 1.63%, to $ 75.84 a barrel. U.S. crude gained $ 1.76, or 2.4%, to $ 75.18 a barrel.

Spot gold prices rose $ 3.3126, or 0.19%, to $ 1,773.12 an ounce.

Reporting by Elizabeth Dilts Marshall in New York and Marc Jones in London; edited by Jonathan Oatis

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Johan Wieth of Iceage: “You should be very careful listening to too much music when writing an album. It tends to get a little too explicit “ https://borealnet.org/johan-wieth-of-iceage-you-should-be-very-careful-listening-to-too-much-music-when-writing-an-album-it-tends-to-get-a-little-too-explicit/ https://borealnet.org/johan-wieth-of-iceage-you-should-be-very-careful-listening-to-too-much-music-when-writing-an-album-it-tends-to-get-a-little-too-explicit/#respond Tue, 29 Jun 2021 09:37:32 +0000 https://borealnet.org/johan-wieth-of-iceage-you-should-be-very-careful-listening-to-too-much-music-when-writing-an-album-it-tends-to-get-a-little-too-explicit/ The members of Iceage were teenagers when their debut album, New brigade, an explosion of post-punk-infused hardcore, was released in 2011. “When I saw an amp, I set it all up,” says guitarist Johan Wieth of his initial approach. Over the next three albums, the band’s sound developed, softening rough edges and embracing melody without […]]]>

The members of Iceage were teenagers when their debut album, New brigade, an explosion of post-punk-infused hardcore, was released in 2011. “When I saw an amp, I set it all up,” says guitarist Johan Wieth of his initial approach.

Over the next three albums, the band’s sound developed, softening rough edges and embracing melody without losing their emotional core. New version Find shelter go further.

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https://borealnet.org/johan-wieth-of-iceage-you-should-be-very-careful-listening-to-too-much-music-when-writing-an-album-it-tends-to-get-a-little-too-explicit/feed/ 0
Johnson County growers discuss tackling drought conditions https://borealnet.org/johnson-county-growers-discuss-tackling-drought-conditions/ https://borealnet.org/johnson-county-growers-discuss-tackling-drought-conditions/#respond Mon, 28 Jun 2021 02:04:10 +0000 https://borealnet.org/johnson-county-growers-discuss-tackling-drought-conditions/ Farmers and food organizations talk about the recent drought struggles on their land and the means they have taken to tackle the lack of rain in the region. Jeff sigmund Corn husks turn brown due to lack of rain on Monday June 21, 2021. A field planted with corn is beginning to show the effects […]]]>

Farmers and food organizations talk about the recent drought struggles on their land and the means they have taken to tackle the lack of rain in the region.

Jeff sigmund

Corn husks turn brown due to lack of rain on Monday June 21, 2021. A field planted with corn is beginning to show the effects of lack of rain. The leaves turn brown and the stems are short.


Steve Swenka, owner of Double G Angus Farms in Johnson County, said this summer his farm had experienced one of the worst droughts of his life.

“We’ve only had about two inches of rain throughout May and only two-tenths of an inch in June so far,” Swenka said on June 22, before Johnson County suffered. several showers over the next few days. “We have cow pastures burning, the streams narrow down to the bed and you see corn in the middle of the hot day starting to curl up. “

The National Integrated Drought Information System, last updated on June 24, said Johnson County drought state is “abnormally dry” and is listed with a participation last 30 days rate.

In the United States, 181.5 million acres of crops and 14.4 million beef cattle are currently experiencing drought, according to the US Department of Agriculture.

Jake Kundert, director of food systems for Grow Johnson County, an Iowa Valley nonprofit, said he had also felt the impact of the drought on their produce.

Grow Johnson County produces over 25,000 pounds of organic vegetables each year and donates them to local hunger relief agencies.

RELATED: Iowa City plants 400 trees in 2020, seeks to break 2021 planting record

“Everything we grow is given,” Kundert said. “We give jobs on the farm and teach people how to do these techniques themselves. “

Kundert said food organizations, like Grow Johnson County, have struggled to counter this recent struggle to grow crops.

For Grow Johnson County, they worked to irrigate as much as possible until they saw more rain.

“The challenge is to put our crops that have been inside the garden centers, which are in perfect conditions, and then take them out into the hot, dry sun. Plants die, ”Kundert said.

Kundert said Grow Johnson County is trying new sprinkler systems that can hold water more efficiently, such as a no-till production method, and adapt to the Iowa climate.

If water is not immediately given to plants from streams and irrigation systems, then they will have less volume and maybe not even the same crop.

Buyers of these crops have seen less and less volume of production since the lack of rain hit them.

“Some growers I know couldn’t name many because the weather conditions affected it and they couldn’t install a water supply system at the plant,” Ben Dolan said. , a Field to Family worker.

This company buys crops from other producers for resale.

Farmers must continue to adapt and overcome obstacles like climate change.

As soon as Grow Johnson County finished replanting the crops in the outdoor soil, Kundert said Grow Johnson County staff were doing everything in their power to water them.

“Once we’ve planted them, we think about what water and irrigation system we can use to give these plants the water they need,” Kundert said.

Swenka said he was unable to set up irrigation systems at the last minute. Its first objective is to take care of the cattle.

“We are pumping as much water as possible out of the stream to water the burning cow pastures,” Swenka said. “The first goal is to get food for the summer, the second goal is to get food for the winter. “

Swenka kept saying that farmers are a resilient group.

“We are overcoming and always adapting to new things every year, it’s about managing risk and resources,” Swenka said.

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