Sound Engineers – Borealnet http://borealnet.org/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 02:26:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://borealnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Sound Engineers – Borealnet http://borealnet.org/ 32 32 “The motorbike is a very sensual thing”: will the bikers accept to lose their vroom? | Electric vehicles https://borealnet.org/the-motorbike-is-a-very-sensual-thing-will-the-bikers-accept-to-lose-their-vroom-electric-vehicles/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 00:43:51 +0000 https://borealnet.org/the-motorbike-is-a-very-sensual-thing-will-the-bikers-accept-to-lose-their-vroom-electric-vehicles/ The throaty roar rising from the boot stands was Flag Marshal Shane Adderton’s signal. The 34-year-old technician has been involved in the motorcycle world since his teenage years, and volunteering at Mallala Motorsport Park, South Australia’s racing mecca, has always given him a special thrill. “When you hear them start and leave the pits, that […]]]>

The throaty roar rising from the boot stands was Flag Marshal Shane Adderton’s signal. The 34-year-old technician has been involved in the motorcycle world since his teenage years, and volunteering at Mallala Motorsport Park, South Australia’s racing mecca, has always given him a special thrill.

“When you hear them start and leave the pits, that sound is something you look forward to,” he says. “That note of the exhaust – the emotion it creates is part of the attractiveness.”

The vromage of the pits also serves a more practical purpose. As Flag Marshal, it was Adderton’s signal to come out and wave the bikes into place, pointing out all the dangers and dangers on the track.

One day of racing at Mallala, Adderton completely missed his signal. When he first officiated in an electric motorcycle race, Adderton learned a valuable lesson: he could no longer count on a deafening rumble of warning. “I didn’t even know the e-bikes were on the track until they passed me,” he says.

Adderton, a technical caddy, enjoys tinkering with his four bikes, but lack of understanding of mechanical workings means he’s not sure to add an electric model to his collection.

He is not alone in his reluctance. That throaty roar he loves so much has inspired not only art and culture, but thousands of clubs around the world full of dedicated people roaming the roads with nothing between their bodies and an internal combustion engine except one. good set of leathers.

But eventually these engines will become a thing of the past, and motorcycles must be a part of it. Global Market Insights estimates that the international electric motorcycle market will grow from $ 42 billion in 2020 to $ 56 billion by 2027 – but this analysis assumes increased government support and tighter emissions regulations.

Thyron Van Vuuren on a Voltron-Evo electric motorcycle at Queensland Raceway in 2016. Photography: Tony Castley

The sound of the engine’s silence

For such small vehicles, conventional motorcycles have an inordinate environmental impact. Although gasoline-powered cars are more polluting overall, they are subject to more stringent exhaust regulations than their two-wheeled counterparts, which emit higher levels of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and carbon monoxide. ‘nitrogen.

The quest for ever louder engines is contributing to this problem, with the removal of emission gears, a popular modification by bikers to give their exhaust systems extra resonance.

“There is something guttural and intense in [conventional motorbikes] that resonates through you, ”says Michelle Nazzari. “Obviously there are the carcinogens and all that you have to think about, but there is also a beauty to that. “

Nazzari was a little keen on oil herself, rummaging through farms with her two-stroke all-terrain motorcycle, but then devised a plan to make emission-free motorcycles while driving through Colombia in 2010. She co-founded Fonz Moto . company and these days its rides provide a different kind of thrill.

When she leaves her workshop in Redfern, Nazzari takes out one of her electric motorcycles and escapes two hours south of Sydney to Macquarie Pass.

“This is one of the best rides in New South Wales,” says Nazzari of the winding hairpin bends that lead from the coast to the dramatic expanses of the Southern Highlands.

Without the distraction of the engine noise or the chills, Nazzari says she feels more present in the moment, with the only vibration coming from the texture of the road.

“Having no vibration in the powertrain, you can really focus on the quality of the ride, without worrying about the clutch,” she says. “When you walk into real winding chunks, you can really feel it.”

Regarding the safety concerns of silent bikes, Nazzari retorts that the quiet engine means the rider can be more aware of the dangers around them. “You can hear everything that is going on around you and are much more present for that reason,” she says.

Social media feeds for the Sydney-based electric motorcycle company are replete with what Nazzari describes as “emasculating comments” about the lack of vroom.

Michelle Nazzari, co-founder of Fonz Moto with one of her electric bikes
Michelle Nazzari, co-founder of Fonz Moto, with her Fonzarelli NKD. Without the sound of the engine, “you can really focus on the quality of the ride.” Photograph: Dennis Lindsay / Style Rider Motorcycles / Instagram

“One of the questions most frequently asked by opponents is, ‘Are you doing one for men? », She laughs. “They’re just trolls I guess, with that masculinity thing around the sound.”

The comments turned from sexism and homophobia to a simple rejection of silence. “Fill that in,” read one person’s point of view. “I’m going to stick with my 2000 R1 which makes me smile when I hear it rev up… can’t be called a gasoline head if you like EVs.”

“Autonomy is a real problem outside the cities”

Boris Mihailovic, one of Australia’s leading writers on motorcycle culture, doesn’t think he’ll ever go electric. The burly, tattooed author of Altar of the Road Gods has been a vocal critic of electric models, which he says look more like devices than actual motorcycles.

“Motorcycles are a very sensual thing,” he told Guardian Australia. “I love the noise they make… The first thing a lot of people do when buying a bike is put the exhaust system in place and put on a more precise exhaust. Ducatis, Harleys – they live off the incredible hearing pleasure they provide.

Mihailovic, who advises Australian electric motorcycle maker Savic Motorcycles on how to appeal to true oil enthusiasts, says he personally needs “that connection between the dinosaur explosion and the throttle”, and believes that at least half of bikers will be resistant to the new technology. “Motorcyclists are generally an aging population, men aged 50 and over. ”

Manufacturers of electric motorcycles, he says, are therefore turning to the younger generations. Mihailovic suggests they’ll be more interested in the emissions side of things, as well as the instantaneous rapid acceleration offered by the electric. “The younger ones are happy to avoid the thunder and the lighting and just ride on the lighting without the thunder,” he says.

But a problem for many cyclists is the lack of charging infrastructure to facilitate the long-distance road trips so emblematic of biker culture.

“Autonomy is a real problem outside the cities,” says Mihailovic.

Michelle Nazzari on an electric motorcycle
Michelle Nazzari e-motorbiking: “When you step into real twisty tracks you can really feel it. “ Photograph: Mark Kolbe / Getty Images

Meanwhile, Australian Electric Vehicle Association National Secretary Dr Chris Jones says federal and state electric vehicle policies at best neglect electric motorcycles and in some cases deliberately exclude them.

“Governments have spent the past 30 years demonizing motorcycles as coffins on wheels,” he says. “The last thing they want to do is promote such small, efficient, traffic-free ways of getting around after demonizing them for so long.”

Jones is an electric motorcycle enthusiast himself and was one of the engineers behind the Voltron-Evo that dominated the Australian electronic racing circuit in the mid-2010s. the development of racers convinced him that Australia could have a thriving electric motorcycle industry if supported.

Jones wants to see state government grants available for electric cars extended to motorcycles and stricter emissions standards for conventional motorcycles. Others in the industry are pushing for the removal of the stamp duty – a policy already in place in ACT and New South Wales.

Whatever support electric motorcycles ultimately get, the open question remains whether bikers will be able to overcome the cultural attachment to the vroom.

Back in Adelaide, Adderton did not completely rule out getting an electric model. He’s heard that they accelerate a lot faster these days and could be good for commuting around town. Adderton is also aware that not everyone is as passionate about the rumble of engines as he is.

“I have friends who have bike paths in the hills and they make a lot of noise,” he says. “So yeah, I could see the electricity was good over there, you know – out of consideration for the neighbors.”


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New Year’s News | Musical features https://borealnet.org/new-years-news-musical-features/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 10:01:44 +0000 https://borealnet.org/new-years-news-musical-features/ Click to enlarge The Steel Woods, along with Brushville, play the Doug Warcup Benefit at Danenberger Family Vineyards this Saturday night. Welcome everyone to 2022, a current calculation of time based on our concoction called the Gregorian Calendar. Throughout the year, several other New Years Eve and New Years days are recognized at various times […]]]>

Click to enlarge

The Steel Woods, along with Brushville, play the Doug Warcup Benefit at Danenberger Family Vineyards this Saturday night.

Welcome everyone to 2022, a current calculation of time based on our concoction called the Gregorian Calendar. Throughout the year, several other New Years Eve and New Years days are recognized at various times in other cultures, but here in the good ol ‘United States and in many places around the world this past weekend , we celebrated another trip around the sun. Hope you had a good time doing it, but now that the hype is behind us, it’s back to business.

We have a few COVID-related cancellations to report, and one of the most significant for our community already happened when First Night Springfield was postponed for a year. Not only has it been a big disappointment for everyone involved on both sides of the party, but for the Springfield Area Arts Council, First Night is part of the financial equation that keeps this organization wonderful and vital. I’m sure that in the able hands of Executive Director Sheila Walk and the hard-working volunteer board of directors everything will be fine, but here is a wheelbarrow full of good wishes for our friends at SAAC in 2022 and a cry. to all the good work done in the past years. If there is anything we can do to help you let us know and we will do our best to satisfy you.

The International Blues Challenge set to be held in Memphis in January is now postponed until later in the year, directly affecting local competitors and planned fundraisers to support them. I guess every time the IBC is reprogrammed things will start over on “Memphis Road”.

Rick Dunham’s tribute to Elvis, booked at the Hoogland for this Saturday (January 8, the 87th birthday of the real Mr. Presley) has been postponed to a safer time later this year. Rick, as Elvis Himselvis, has performed all over the United States during his 35+ years wearing the suit. This performance, the third and final in a series of ambitious shows tracing every hit of Elvis ‘Top 40, spanned from 1968 to 1981 (he continued to feature even after his untimely death in 1977) and contains many of Elvis’ most popular songs. most famous of the King as well as several obscure and little-known figures that broke into the Top 40 in its heyday.

I will do my best to keep you posted on these events when they return.

In the unpleasant but important task of announcing benefits for those we have lost, this Saturday (January 8, 7 p.m.) Danenberger’s Family Vineyards presents The Steel Woods and Brushville at a paid event (there is also a silent auction ) in support of the Doug Warcup family. Doug, one of the best sound engineers in our area and a really great guy, left this world unexpectedly the night after Thanksgiving.

This past Saturday (January 1), the Curve Inn hosted a celebration of life and family benefit for Adrian Muex, a Decatur-based musician, founder of the Smooth Times Band and a good guy who passed away on December 8.

If you are interested in helping the families of these two recently deceased members of our music community, please contact the locations concerned or check the event’s Facebook pages for more information.

With that, I’ll sign the first Now Playing of 2022 with a special thank you to all who read and enjoy my articles. I consider it an honor and a privilege to be able to write about our music community. And if you have anything I could share here, please drop me a line.

Be sure to check out our listings for all the great live music happening this week across town.


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Cross it and step into a new year https://borealnet.org/cross-it-and-step-into-a-new-year/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 14:12:42 +0000 https://borealnet.org/cross-it-and-step-into-a-new-year/ Rukes in front of The Drunken Worm on the 39th. // Photo by Jim Nimmo Welcome to 2022. New year, new you, etc. Our January issue is traditionally about change, regrowth and reassessment. You’ll find plenty of articles about the future in these pages, from Barb Shelly’s article on political traps Missouri and Kansas might […]]]>

Rukes in front of The Drunken Worm on the 39th. // Photo by Jim Nimmo

Welcome to 2022. New year, new you, etc.

Our January issue is traditionally about change, regrowth and reassessment. You’ll find plenty of articles about the future in these pages, from Barb Shelly’s article on political traps Missouri and Kansas might fall into to Liz Cook’s adventure in the boutique world of cocktail rehab IV .

You can read it all here:

We, as a publication, also look forward to the adventure that awaits us in ’22. Part of that journey begins with, in case you haven’t heard it yet, a new owner. My wife, Vivian, and I joined a group of local and regional businessmen to buy Field. Wild, right? I don’t know how it happened either. What I do know is that we can’t wait to embark on a new era.

The pressure of navigating that purchase while running a post turned the final piece of 2021 into the most complicated and poorly controlled time of my adult life. My coup as a solution to this situation has traditionally been a double blow of overwork and self-sabotage. Pedal to the metal and do not recognize anything. Taking care of yourself is not my strong suit.

In the midst of all this chaos, I came across a chance encounter with Candice Rukes.

Rukes is a local, or at least was one in a previous life. She has spent her career as a touring production coordinator. Whenever a musician / performer goes on tour, someone has to lead the small army of roadies: sound engineers, caterers, bus drivers, security guards, etc. She has toured for several years with John Legend, the Jonas Brothers, Justin Timberlake, The Killers and Will Smith and his entire extended family.

She managed halftime Super Bowl shows. She spends most of the days of her life starting a stadium extravaganza from square one and bringing it to fruition by the time the clock strikes midnight. Rinse and repeat the next day, in a new town.

Rukes, along with some friends in the industry, has long recognized that people in their world are suffering from their own specific epidemic.

“You don’t talk about your problems on tour. Not at all, ”Rukes told me. “Because you are replaceable. The production wants you to pull yourself together or not show up. Nobody gives you a little time off when you get a bipolar II diagnosis. Dealing with huge performers – and often accompanying groups of up to 20 musicians – means no one is ready to help. Even if they wanted to, they didn’t have time.

Rukes told me his story on the road, interspersed with some sordid gossip.

“A touring production is essentially a military maneuver,” she says. “Don’t ask, don’t say. No resources will be allocated to help you. You have 120 people going from town to town every day, none of whom see their families. This culture of brotherhood of hazing and abuse fills the void.

This frustration is what led Rukes and a small group of other touring professionals to start The Roadie Clinic. Currently housed in a facility in Niles, Michigan, the Roadie Clinic provides resources to those in the touring world who need services they would not otherwise have access to.

Employees on tour often do not have a permanent address. This leads to issues like the inability to work with banks (and the idea of ​​applying for a mortgage is a pipe dream). In the absence of advocacy groups or unions on the ground, most truckers do not have health insurance. Safe housing and skilled professional care are not available to all of this field of employment.

Or it wasn’t until now. The clinic provides access to online mental health counselors, in-person rehabilitation services, and even accountants to help overcome the daily obstacles of road warrior financial battles. It’s a top-down system to restore the lives of professionals in the industry who, like a shark, will die if they stop moving.

Rukes wants to see the Roadie Clinic expand to a KC location as soon as possible. This city is a hub for touring productions, and its location would make it an ideal destination for those seeking its support throughout the Midwest.

“This building in KC can be a beacon,” Rukes says, “to let the rest of the country know that on so many levels, KC doesn’t care about advocacy.”

My conversation with Rukes left me inspired and invigorated on many levels after feeling like I kept hitting the same walls over and over again. It’s one thing to hear this advice from a therapist, it’s another to hear it from someone who travels along your same patterns: put your head down and try to get through it rather than to take a moment to breathe. I could trust her, she was like me.

While I can’t wait to spend my year pushing community leaders to help us establish a Roadie Clinic branch, I personally have no one to thank more for helping me turn my year around Rukes – and this traveling companion encouraged me to turn against all my normal inclinations. Just stopping to enjoy life and take care of myself has been a radical transformation.

When you’re going through it, sometimes the quickest way out is to stay completely still.

Go ahead and we’ll make it happen,

Brock Signature


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What to expect from CES in TV and audio https://borealnet.org/what-to-expect-from-ces-in-tv-and-audio/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 12:00:47 +0000 https://borealnet.org/what-to-expect-from-ces-in-tv-and-audio/ CES is back. For real this time. Following the all-digital affair of 2021, the upcoming trade show is reverting to a physical presence with people trampling the floors of the Las Vegas show. CES 2022 starts Jan. 5 and ends Jan. 8, but news will drop as soon as you finish your New Years meal. […]]]>

CES is back. For real this time. Following the all-digital affair of 2021, the upcoming trade show is reverting to a physical presence with people trampling the floors of the Las Vegas show.

CES 2022 starts Jan. 5 and ends Jan. 8, but news will drop as soon as you finish your New Years meal. And as always, plenty of exhibitors will be looking to show off what’s to come for the rest of 2022. Here’s what we expect to see.

Panasonic and techniques

Advertising See and Feel Everything from Panasonic

We’re betting our last dollar Panasonic will unveil their latest OLED flagship as they always do, with the rest of the 2022 TV lineup announced at a later date.

What can we expect from the successor of the fabulous JZ2000? A pinch of improvements across the board is likely, but since the JZ2000 used the same panel as the HZ2000 before it, we hope the engineers at Panasonic have spent some time figuring out how to squeeze more brightness out of their already pretty OLED Master. luminous. HDR Professional Edition Panel.

From Technics, we have a feeling its new flagship EAH-800 noise canceling headset will be unveiled, after being teased at CES 21.

Samsung

A black 4K Samsung Neo QLED TV hanging on a wall with an old man sitting on a chair and watching TV

More QLED 4K and 8K Neo are expected after an impressive debut in ’21. Our guess is that Samsung will be looking for more gains in brightness, scaling, and expansion of its gaming functionality.

There’s also Samsung’s QD-OLED to think about, but will they be revealed at the event? We know they’re coming, but we think they’ll focus more on their Neo QLED line.

There’s also the fact that Samsung might be doing something a little different this year with its product line. The Korean firm has a lot of interests, so maybe we’ll see another The Premiere-style lifestyle spotlight?

Sony

A black and bronze Sony SRS RA5000 loudspeaker on a white background, three bronze loudspeaker plates on top and control buttons on the right

Sony has had a great year 2021. Its OLEDs were excellent, the WF-1000XM4 groundbreaking, and the soundbars fantastic.

So we expect that momentum to continue with the new Bravia 4K OLEDs and 8K LCD TVs. Rumors are circulating that Sony will also launch its own QD-OLED panels (in 55 and 65 inches). We’re not sure they’ll appear at the event, at least maybe not in public, but we could be wrong.

2022 should see the WH-1000XM5 (or whatever its name) arrive, but we won’t hear about it at CES. A new line of headphones below the premium options may be announced, but an update to Sony’s 360 Reality Audio should be in sight, and maybe we’ll see more 360RA products announced.

His bone

Will Sonos arrive? Vegas isn’t particularly far from California, but will it be announcing any products? A Sub Mini is in the works (leaked via Sonos’ own app) and CES would mark the right time to announce it. We wouldn’t be surprised if there was more news about Sonos’ tie-up with Audi on their in-car audio system.

LG

LG OLED with Dolby Vision Gaming

Although LG will be exhibiting at the event, much like Schrödinger’s cat, neither will he. The 42-inch OLED TV will launch there, however, as LG seeks to expand the size range within the OLED lineup. Will there be even larger sizes? It’s possible.

Otherwise, like the 2021 edition, it’ll be more 4K and 8K OLEDs, more news on QNED Mini-LED TVs, more details on the upcoming webOS interface, and a refresh of their soundbar lineup.

TCL

2021 TCL OD Zero LED Mini TVs

TCL’s Mini LED TVs have taken off in the US and Europe, but the UK is a bit blunt with a different specification. With those moans out of the way, the OD Zero displays announced at the last CES are expected in 2022, the 85-inch OD Zero X925 PRO has already won a CES 2022 innovation award.

TCL dropped the news in 2021 that it was looking to produce its own QD-OLED (dubbed H-OLED). Maybe we’ll see this conceptual model at the show.

Hisense

Like TCL, Hisense’s US offering differs from that of the UK, but we’ll take a look and assume that it will be more of its laser projection TVs, more ULED models, some 8K TVs and more Roku TVs.

Qualcomm

Very portable looking Elogan wireless speaker with attractive dragon logo

Didn’t you expect to see Qualcomm on this list? The chipset maker has increased its influence in the Bluetooth audio market, and CES 2022 may provide more concrete information on which products will support the company’s new Snapdragon Sound format.


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The ancient epic that inspired The Northman https://borealnet.org/the-ancient-epic-that-inspired-the-northman/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://borealnet.org/the-ancient-epic-that-inspired-the-northman/ After two masterful blows in The witch and Lighthouse, director Robert Eggers’ next film was bound to be a big topic of conversation. Little is known about the film, but perhaps some interesting clues can be gathered by examining the film’s apparent source; Amleth’s story. Robert Eggers has only directed the two aforementioned feature films, […]]]>

After two masterful blows in The witch and Lighthouse, director Robert Eggers’ next film was bound to be a big topic of conversation. Little is known about the film, but perhaps some interesting clues can be gathered by examining the film’s apparent source; Amleth’s story.

Robert Eggers has only directed the two aforementioned feature films, but his unique style and incredible direction have helped him stand out as a big new talent. Eggers was asked to remake the beloved 1922 classic Nosferatu in 2015, and the project appears to be underway. The director’s other announced project is The man of the North, which has just unveiled its first trailer.

GAMERANT VIDEO OF THE DAY

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In The man of the NorthAlexander Skarsgard portrays a character named Amleth, described as a Viking prince seeking revenge for his murdered father. Ethan Hawke is portrayed as Horwendil and Claes Bang is portrayed as Feng, respectively Amleth’s father and uncle. Along with that few bits of information is a handful of other character names, setting details, and director commentary to make it clear to the film’s source material. The man of the North would be the closest thing to the full adaptation Eggers created. Headlight began as a loose adaptation of an unfinished story by Edgar Allen Poe, but has gradually grown into his own work. Based on limited details and the new trailer, The man of the North is a modern dramatization of a classic tale, modeled on David Lowery The green knight. It’s a fascinating direction for Eggers’ work, and while it’s certain that the director will take artistic liberties, perhaps the basic plot will follow that of Amleth’s story.



northman screenshot cropped

Set in Iceland, the film is based on an old story famous in the country which is believed to have originated around the 10th century. The main expert on the story was an author called Saxo, who was commissioned to create a comprehensive history of Denmark. Amleth’s Story was the most famous entry in this historical encyclopedia. Both the tale’s first appearance and its evolution are disputed, but the tale is an integral part of Scandinavian and Icelandic myth. There is also quite a bit of hesitation in the story itself, as multiple versions change the details and aspects for new audiences. The man of the North appears to be a more in-depth exploration of this semi-complete story, weaving in some of Eggers’ stellar eyes the precision of the era to create a compelling narrative.


Amleth’s story is simple, anagram fans may have noticed that the hero’s name is a slight rearrangement from Shakespeare’s Danish prince name. Yes, Amleth is the direct inspiration of The tragedy of Hamlet, the longest and perhaps the most influential of the 39 plays written by William Shakespeare. Inspire the bard to compose Hamlet is the main legacy of Amleth’s tale, which made the original tale somewhat obscure as the Norse myth says. The two stories are similar in many ways, but Hamlet is kind of an adaptation, so there are a handful of key changes. Hamlet is a more complex and fleshed out story, rich in emotional detail and catharsis, while Amleth’s story is more utilitarian. This could be a side effect of the narrative which underwent many translations prior to its modern incarnation, and the fact that earlier versions of the story may well be lost to the story.


Amleth is the Prince of Denmark, son of Queen Gerutha and King Horwendil. Amleth Feng’s uncle, seized with jealous rage, kills Horwendil and takes the throne. Feng convinces his sister-in-law to marry him, claiming that her murder was justified and that her former husband despised her. Terrified of becoming the next victim, Amleth feigns insanity to avoid Feng’s wrath. Feng tests Amleth’s willpower, prompting him with the affection of a young woman to force the young man to drop the facade. He asks Gerutha to speak to Amleth privately, leaving a spy nearby in the hopes that Amleth will reveal himself to his mother.



Northman-film-shot

Amleth then kills the spy, establishing to Feng’s satisfaction that he is mentally sane. Feng sends the young man to England with a pair of anonymous servants and a letter ordering his execution, but Amleth discovers the letter and carefully edits it. Amleth’s edited letter sends his masters to the gallows and convinces the King of England to marry his daughter to Amleth. Now prince of two nations, Amleth stayed in England for a year before returning for revenge. Amleth implements her long-standing plan, setting her uncle’s classic on fire and killing her uncle with his blade in chaos. Amleth succeeds, but unlike Hamlet, survives his meeting with revenge, marries another woman, and kills another stepfather before his death and famous burial.


Amleth is a story of revenge and family, royalty and subterfuge, war and violence, and she will finally receive her day in the sun. Drowned by Hamlet, The man of the North will introduce this lesser-known and almost millennial Nordic myth to a new audience, no doubt with a powerful touch from Robert Eggers.

MORE: Alexander Skarsgård Pursues Revenge In New The Northman Trailer


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Shellfish company tackles weeds (Shellfish company tackles weeds) – High Country News – Know the West https://borealnet.org/shellfish-company-tackles-weeds-shellfish-company-tackles-weeds-high-country-news-know-the-west/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 09:03:09 +0000 https://borealnet.org/shellfish-company-tackles-weeds-shellfish-company-tackles-weeds-high-country-news-know-the-west/ The light of the The October full moon bounced off the surface of Similk Bay in Washington. Stuart Thomas stood ankle-deep in the ebb tide, turning over black mesh bags full of oysters. He opened a bag and pulled out a handful of little ones, barely an inch in diameter, quickly flaking them in the […]]]>

The light of the The October full moon bounced off the surface of Similk Bay in Washington. Stuart Thomas stood ankle-deep in the ebb tide, turning over black mesh bags full of oysters.

He opened a bag and pulled out a handful of little ones, barely an inch in diameter, quickly flaking them in the light of his headlamp. “These are oysters from Olympia,” said Thomas, happily despite the midnight hour. The only oysters native to the state, they are finally making a comeback after being virtually threatened with extinction more than a century ago due to overexploitation, habitat destruction and a commercial preference for them. introduced species, such as the Pacific oyster.

The flesh inside the Olympia’s shell is only about the size of a quarter. It tastes pungent, brackish, and slightly stony, older, in a way, than the sweet, creamy Pacific oysters that are the mainstay of Washington’s farmed shellfish industry.

A self-proclaimed genetics nerd, Thomas is tasked with reviving the Olympia oyster for the Swinomish Shellfish Company. The Englishman had spent years working in the commercial shellfish industry in Washington before joining the company, which is owned by the Swinomish Indian tribal community. Now it operates under a different set of rules, with one main directive: do not disturb the eelgrass beds.

Stuart Thomas, manager of the Swinomish Shellfish Company, harvests oysters on Similk Beach during low tide in October.

“It was made clear to me from the start that anything we had to do had to be environmental protection,” Thomas said.

Within 40 feet of it, the eelgrass lay flat and motionless on the surface of the water. Its immobility belied the importance it has for the marine ecosystem of this part of the world. Grasses serve as nurseries, feeding grounds and resting places for a dizzying number of species along the food chain, from killer whales to zooplankton, including virtually every marine food used by indigenous communities.

But the plant also grows in or near many of the same places as seashells, and conservation measures to protect it have failed, according to a lawsuit that Swinomish filed against the federal government in 2018. Food Security, Now and in the World future, should not be sacrificed for economic gain, argues the tribe; the two can coexist. The Swinomish Shellfish Company is determined to prove that other vital species can thrive alongside an industry that brings in $ 150 million a year for the state.

“It was made clear to me from the start that anything we had to do had to be environmental protection.”

Stuart Thomas shows a hollow oyster. On the right, eelgrass at low tide.

THE BAY OF PADILLA, WHICH BORDERS the northern edge of the Swinomish Nation is home to the largest contiguous bed of eelgrass in the Lower 48. At very low tide, tufts of eelgrass swarm and glow in the mud. One of the only family of plants to flower completely underwater, eelgrass is essential to the ecological functioning of Puget Sound; its abundance is considered a key indicator of the health of the estuary.

At high tide, if you dip your head in a bed of eelgrass, you’ll see tiny gas bubbles clinging to the thin, almost translucent green strands. These bubbles are formed by the plant when it inhales CO2 from the water column and exhales oxygen. Studies have shown that eelgrass beds can help alleviate ocean acidification as the water warms – a growing problem for marine animals and the industries that depend on them, especially the shellfish industry.

The importance of the plant goes beyond climate change, however.

“Native eelgrass is a fundamental part of the marine ecosystem. It provides important cover and feeding areas for juvenile salmon, as well as other marine species, such as Dungeness Crab, ”wrote Tino Villaluz, Wildlife Program Manager for the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community and Registered Member. High Country News in an email. “Aquaculture activities that decrease or destroy native eelgrass also remove critical habitat for salmon. “

Walter Clark (Warm Springs, left) and Kalvin Jimmie (Nooksack) are employees of the Swinomish Shellfish Company.

The fight to protect eelgrass is just one part of the larger struggle of the Swinomish Indian tribal community to protect the habitat that supports many of the foods on which they depend for their physical and cultural livelihoods. Over the past decades, the Swinomish have led the charge of protecting habitat for salmon and other species, developing science-based plans to manage populations, restoring swamps and canals, and reforesting streams to keep them alive. cool waters.

The tribe, like many Coast Salish tribal nations, identifies with the Salmon people. But overfishing, habitat loss, dams and climate change have decimated salmon stocks in the Strait, straining the tribe’s economic and cultural lifeline and diminishing the well-being of members of the tribe. tribe, said Villaluz. In 2016, the tribe developed its own set of Indigenous health indicators to better understand the non-physiological components of community health. Access to “first foods”, such as salmon and shellfish, has been identified as essential to the health and well-being of tribal members, especially in a rapidly changing world.

Then, in 2017, a change in federal policy opened up much of the Washington coast to commercial shellfish farming. Fearing that thousands of hectares of mature eelgrass – and the species that depend on it – might be lost, the tribe took the matter to court.

Access to “first foods”, such as salmon and shellfish, has been identified as essential to the health and well-being of tribal members, especially in a rapidly changing world.

Jimmie and Clark clean and sort the oysters at the Swinomish Shellfish Company sorting center.

SINCE 2007, THE BREEDING OF SHELLS operated as part of a large national licensing system overseen by the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2017, despite objections from the Swinomish and environmental groups, the Corps adjusted its rules: now, he said, any place where shellfish farming had taken place in the past 100 years could be considered a continuous operation. and therefore exempt from more stringent eelgrass protection. measures. In North Puget Sound alone, this would have included over 2,000 acres with mature eelgrass beds.

The Swinomish have sued both the Army Corps and the National Marine Fisheries Service, arguing that their ability to fish salmon and harvest shellfish in traditional waters required a healthy ecosystem rooted in eelgrass, and that the creation of such generalized exemptions would put eelgrass at risk. They won against the Army Corps, forcing it to switch from large national licenses for shellfish farms to individual licenses.

But despite the victory, the army corps clearance system can still cause far too much damage to eelgrass beds, said Amy van Saun, an attorney at the Center for Food Safety, who also filed a complaint against the changes to the seagrass. ‘authorization and sues the army. Body again on industrial shellfish mining permits. The Swinomish are still disputing the federal government over how much eelgrass in North Puget Sound can be damaged by shellfish aquaculture. Meanwhile, they are trying to get better protection for eelgrass in the Skagit County Coastal Management Plan.

The objective has never been to stop shellfish farming, simply to ensure that it does not come at the expense of the ecosystem. In the same year that the tribe sued the Corps, they also opened their own shellfish farming operation, determined to prove that coexistence is possible. The Swinomish Shellfish Company’s 55-acre farm was a private oyster farm in the 1930s, but the tribe licensed the farm as a new operation, with much more stringent protections that new operations demand.

Laura Wilbur (Swinomish), whose grandfather helped build the salmon processing facility where the Swinomish Shellfish Company is located, now works for the company.

THE OFFICES OF THE COMPANY OCCUPY a former salmon processing facility, just across the Skagit River from the picturesque town of La Conner. White boxes printed with red and black images of jumping salmon from the former Swinomish salmon company, Native Catch, still line the hallways. The retired salmon preserving machines, which Thomas compares to giant pressure cookers, are empty. Native Catch closed in 2016 after decades of declining salmon stocks. Many fishermen and women redeveloped their boats for crab and shrimp, and salmon went from a daily staple to something that was stored in a common refrigerator and reserved for special occasions like weddings, funerals. and ceremonies.

“I am thrilled to be working in a place where I can give back to my community. “

Laura Wilbur, a member of the Swinomish tribe who now works for the seashell business, spent her childhood playing at the site, which her grandfather helped build, while still selling salmon. Today she is one of the handful of full-time employees of the Swinomish Shellfish Company. “I’m thrilled to be working in a place where I can give back to my community,” she said, standing near the front of the store where the company sells fresh oysters to the public on Fridays, her long waders pulled up. ‘to the thighs.

The shellfish company also sells its oysters at gas stations around the reserve for around a dollar each. Oysters become a mainstay of community gatherings. “Swinomish Fish Company is not just about tribal income,” Thomas said. During the pandemic, the tribe worked to help alleviate food insecurity in the community. Along with a box of staples and fresh produce from a local farm, it also had more traditional dishes: oysters, cleaned and ready to eat, fresh from Puget Sound.

The Swinomish Shellfish Company oyster farm seen during the rising tide.

Sarah Sax is the climate justice researcher at High Country News currently living in countryside Washington. Email him at [email protected] or submit a letter to the editor.

Reporting of this story was supported by the Society of Environmental Journalists.

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A Shore Thing: North Auckland retirees live by the cliffs https://borealnet.org/a-shore-thing-north-auckland-retirees-live-by-the-cliffs/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://borealnet.org/a-shore-thing-north-auckland-retirees-live-by-the-cliffs/ Auckland has 3,200 km of coastline, and as sea levels rise and cliffs erode, some 17,600 homes in the area are at risk. No shore stuff is a Things series that talks to people whose properties are under threat, scientists trying to warn us, and engineers trying to hold back the ocean. Atop a cliff […]]]>

Auckland has 3,200 km of coastline, and as sea levels rise and cliffs erode, some 17,600 homes in the area are at risk. No shore stuff is a Things series that talks to people whose properties are under threat, scientists trying to warn us, and engineers trying to hold back the ocean.

Atop a cliff in Auckland’s Whangaparoa area is a series of houses with stunning ocean views.

Ardern Avenue is an affluent street with retirees in houses and bowriders in alleys, but securing the key to a seaside palace requires more than paying a king’s ransom.

A carefree attitude seems to be the main prerequisite for homeownership in these regions.

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Ardern Avenue in the Whangaparoa region north of Auckland passes near the edge of the cliff.

Chris McKeen / Stuff

Ardern Avenue in the Whangaparoa region north of Auckland passes near the edge of the cliff.

Coastal erosion is not a new problem in Aotearoa, but with rising sea levels and the relentless threat of increasingly severe weather events, it is certainly a problem that is becoming more and more urgent.

The Whangaparaoa Peninsula north of Auckland is in the crosshairs, and Ardern Avenue in Stanmore Bay, in particular, is no stranger to landslides – one house has testified to a plunging pohutukawa in the depths just a few years ago – yet its inhabitants aren’t as panicked as you might expect.

Ross Winefield moved to Ardern Avenue just five weeks ago, returning to his homeland to retire after 35 years in London. He thinks calculated risk is a small price to pay for a house as coveted as his.

“When you have that,” he said, pointing through his floor-to-ceiling windows at the cerulean waves crashing below, “you think, well, what the odds are that over the next 20 years something is really happening? ”

Winefield’s nonchalance shouldn’t be attributed to naivety, despite his recent residency, he’s no stranger to the area – and its problems.

Winefield’s brother lives on Little Manly Beach, on the other side of the Hail Peninsula from Whangaparaoa, and there’s a joke between them. “He says when the cliff falls I can stay with him, but I tease him and say, well, when the tsunami comes…”

It’s a nod to the vulnerability of the entire suburban area – with 75 percent of the peninsula made up of coastal platforms, it’s not just the cliffs that are susceptible to instability. coastal.

Ross Winefield, who recently moved to Ardern Avenue, says being able to retire to a house as coveted as his outweighs the risk of potential erosion.

Chris McKeen / Stuff

Ross Winefield, who recently moved to Ardern Avenue, says being able to retire to a house as coveted as his outweighs the risk of potential erosion.

Whangaparoa was chosen as the pilot case study for the Auckland Council’s new Coastal Management Plan, which will determine how to tackle sea level rise and floods and storms in Auckland over the next 100 years.

Some protective measures are already in place – neighbor Winefield, for example, has put up a palisade wall, an iron defensive structure embedded in the ground – but the results of the plan, expected earlier this year next, will ensure that mitigation plans are strengthened. .

Ross Roberts, the council’s technical resilience manager, said the area was chosen because of its threat to the local community.

“What is happening here is quite similar to what is happening in many other areas around the Auckland coast in similar environments.

“If it was farmland, nobody would necessarily care too much, but because it’s near houses it’s a very different matter,” he says, adding that even though only a part of the cliff is eroding, it can be a serious problem for those who live on it.

The entire Whangaparaoa Peninsula is affected, from Ardern Avenue to Manly Beach on the other side.

Chris McKeen / Stuff

The entire Whangaparaoa Peninsula is affected, from Ardern Avenue to Manly Beach on the other side.

Peter Rice, who lives a stone’s throw from Winefield, is an insurance-trained man who, in his words, “needs to know the risk factor of everything.”

He did due diligence before moving in and requested a cliff report from local geologists; whose results were more reassuring than expected.

“If you asked me if I have any real fears or concerns… well, actually I don’t,” he said. “The report revealed that even if there was a disappearance of the cliff, there would be no risk to the house itself.”

Rice’s worst-case scenario? Farewell to greenery.

“We are aware of the potential for slipping at the back of the garden, but for the rest, I’m honestly not too worried. I have the impression that this erosion has been happening here for many, many decades. I’m 72, so I don’t think this will be a big deal for me for the next 30 years or so that I’m here.

Avenue Ardern is no stranger to cliff slides and landslides.

Chris McKeen / Stuff

Avenue Ardern is no stranger to cliff slides and landslides.

Much like Winefield, Rice’s home on Ardern Ave is but a brief moment in the history of the Cliff.

According to Dr Mark Dickson, a coastal erosion scientist at the University of Auckland, typical cliff erosion rates are, on average, around 3 to 5 cm per year.

It may not seem like much, but, as Dickson points out, individual landslides can remove meters of cliff top in a single event, and these rates are only expected to increase over time.

“It seems likely that the erosion rates of these cliffs will only increase as sea level rise increasingly floods the toe of the cliff, increasing weathering rates and allowing bigger waves from crossing the foreshore and impacting the cliff, ”he said.

On average, typical cliff erosion rates are around 3 to 5 cm per year.

Chris McKeen / Stuff

On average, typical cliff erosion rates are around 3 to 5 cm per year.

While all of Ardern Ave is nestled atop the bluff, Dickson says the risk of erosion differs from property to property, depending on the natural flaws of the rock mass and the history of erosion on the property. a given site.

Thus, a local geotechnical assessment, such as that performed by Rice, is important in assessing personal risk.

Rice likens the danger factor of living on this alluring part of Whangaparaoa to getting on a stepladder or getting behind the wheel of a car, while Winefield justifies his decision by noting how successful every moment of getting out of bed one morning can. involve risks.

“The point is,” Rice explains, “as human beings we take a lot of risks, and we pursue these things naturally.

“It’s the same thing, that’s how I rationalized myself. “

Home ownership on top of a cliff may seem like playing Russian roulette, but if empty rooms equate to luxury mansions with charming vistas, being careful is a small price to pay for living the years. gold with style.


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“Sound, simplicity and design”: Bang & Olufsen products combine form and function https://borealnet.org/sound-simplicity-and-design-bang-olufsen-products-combine-form-and-function/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 17:00:09 +0000 https://borealnet.org/sound-simplicity-and-design-bang-olufsen-products-combine-form-and-function/ Spotlight on companies: Bang & Olufsen, the world’s oldest audio / video company, continues its 96-year tradition of providing “the best design-driven acoustic products on the market” in the La Jolla showroom, says the store owner. Located at 7851 Girard Ave., the La Jolla site offers the full range of Bang & Olufsen products, from […]]]>

Spotlight on companies:

Bang & Olufsen, the world’s oldest audio / video company, continues its 96-year tradition of providing “the best design-driven acoustic products on the market” in the La Jolla showroom, says the store owner.

Located at 7851 Girard Ave., the La Jolla site offers the full range of Bang & Olufsen products, from portable headphones and speakers to home sound systems and televisions.

“We combine sound and aesthetics and there is no other brand that offers what we do,” said store manager Nicole Perez. “The designers and engineers work hand in hand on each project because it’s not just about finding a design that looks great, but about making the sound sound amazing, because it’s really a combination of the two. No one offers sound, simplicity and design like us.

Bang & Olufsen is so aesthetic that there is an exhibition centered on Bang & Olufsen at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and so acoustically advanced that it is the home speaker system for residents of La Jolla and musicians Alicia Keys and Swizz Beatz.

“I come from the music industry; I worked for Universal Music and Gibson Guitars, ”said store owner David Junk. “I’ve been around musicians and directors all my life, and the most important thing about Bang & Olufsen is allowing people to listen to music the way the artist intended. And our televisions and the movie mode they offer are designed with directors in mind, that’s how the filmmaker wanted you to see it. “

Bang & Olufsen pioneered many simplified methods of transmitting sound, such as preset radio stations in a car and the steering wheel function on the first generations of iPods, and were the first to offer a high-performance system. – speakers for the whole house.

“We always try to stay one step ahead and always think about how this product will fit into your life,” said Perez. “We can do anything. You can come with a set of plans and we can design your whole house if that’s what you are looking for. The materials are all sourced and made in Denmark, which Perez says allows for Scandinavian design and quality.

Perez joined Bang & Olufsen in the Bay Area in 2011, and moved to San Diego in October 2020 and now lives in UTC. She is a member of the board of directors of the La Jolla Village Merchants Association and will be sworn in at a future meeting.

“People tell me they’ve never heard the sound as it comes out of a B&O speaker,” she said. “They tell me that they’ve never heard a person breathe after singing lyrics, or that they’ve never heard a guitar so clearly as they can hear their fingers scratching. We all love music, music takes us through all the feelings we have in this world. It’s there for us, and what’s better than crystal-clear sound?

Bang & Olufsen is located at 7851 Girard Ave. and is open from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday to Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday, 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sunday and Monday by appointment. Learn more: (858) 750-2202 or bang-olufsen.com.

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Washington’s shellfish aquaculture license challenged again https://borealnet.org/washingtons-shellfish-aquaculture-license-challenged-again/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 19:37:42 +0000 https://borealnet.org/washingtons-shellfish-aquaculture-license-challenged-again/ For the second time in four years, the Center for Food Safety (CFS) has sued the federal government to prevent the US Army Corps of Engineers from approving plans in Washington state to develop shellfish aquaculture without holding account for their environmental impact. The lawsuit, filed Monday, December 19 in U.S. District Court in Seattle, […]]]>

For the second time in four years, the Center for Food Safety (CFS) has sued the federal government to prevent the US Army Corps of Engineers from approving plans in Washington state to develop shellfish aquaculture without holding account for their environmental impact.

The lawsuit, filed Monday, December 19 in U.S. District Court in Seattle, Washington, by the CFS, claims the Corps policies violate the Clean Water Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act and other federal laws . It comes after the Corps finalized a new permit in January 2021, in the final days of the Trump administration.

The CFS and the Coalition to Protect Puget Sound, a co-plaintiff in the case, said the new license had been rushed and ignored their comments. They said commercial shellfish farms in Puget Sound and Willapa Bay could endanger the region’s ecosystems.

It’s similar to the permit the Corps attempted to issue in 2017, only for the CFS to block it in court.

“Despite clear statutory mandates and an earlier court ruling requiring the government to fully consider the potential impacts of proposed shellfish operations, the Corps continues to ignore its duties in allowing industrial shellfish operations to degrade important aquatic habitats, including through the use of plastics and pesticides. , endangering Washington’s shores, biodiversity and surrounding communities, ”CFS senior counsel Amy van Saun said in a statement.

Many of the licensed shellfish farms are located near the breeding and spawning grounds of species such as salmon and whales. Conservation groups have also said the farms are eliminating plants and grasses that support other wildlife and protect the environment.

Coalition to Protect Puget Sound director Laura Hendricks said in a statement the government needs to do a better job for Washington’s coastal areas.

“The Coalition is outraged that the Corps is trying to avoid doing what is necessary as the bare minimum under the law to protect orcas, salmon and marine life in Washington from the toxic and physical impacts of the massive number of ‘aquaculture operations on an industrial scale. that have been proposed, ”said Hendricks.

Photo courtesy of StompingGirl / Shutterstock


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Elected officials should take charge of cleaning up Golden Ray | Daily Editorial https://borealnet.org/elected-officials-should-take-charge-of-cleaning-up-golden-ray-daily-editorial/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://borealnet.org/elected-officials-should-take-charge-of-cleaning-up-golden-ray-daily-editorial/ If Dr. Seuss was alive today and describing the wreckage and subsequent dismantling of the Golden Ray ship, he could go back to that famous line to the song “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch” and use these words: Stink, Smelly, smelly. The Golden Isles must do everything in their power to ensure that nothing […]]]>

If Dr. Seuss was alive today and describing the wreckage and subsequent dismantling of the Golden Ray ship, he could go back to that famous line to the song “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch” and use these words: Stink, Smelly, smelly.

The Golden Isles must do everything in their power to ensure that nothing so or more obnoxious can be added to that three-word line at some future date.

Environmentalists are right. Everything that can be done must be done to ensure that all potentially harmful effects of the wreckage and the unprecedented rescue operation have been removed. History has shown the world time and time again that hidden problems can arise long after engineers and cleaning crews have returned home.

Our public officials may request or require a thorough inspection by an independent body of the impact of the overturned auto transporter on the area. This includes the strait, beaches, marshes and tidal streams.

The people who should be at the forefront of this demand are the city and county commissioners, the community’s state legislative delegation, and the three men who speak on behalf of the Golden Isles and the rest of Georgia in the United States House of Representatives and Senate. They are in a key position to push for a full after-the-fact analysis of this sensitive coastal environment.

The last thing this community needs is for their kids or paying guests to worry about walking or swimming in the remains of the Golden Ray. Lots of fuel and oil leaked from the ship when engineers chopped it into huge pieces. It would be beneficial for everyone, including the local economy and the jobs it produces, to do everything possible and within the knowledge and power of 21st century science to ensure that no bad surprise does not await the Golden Islands later.

An environmental surprise could also prove detrimental, if not fatal, to our recreational and commercial fishing industries. Both have enough challenges to overcome, including the ongoing pandemic, without having to face a latent environmental disaster.

This more in-depth environmental assessment should be done as early as possible, before the manager’s checkbook is closed.


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